PPP Ezine, Vol 1 Issue 2, Interview: Sofia Kioroglou

SK

PPP Ezine: Who are your favorite poets, if possible, also tell us what makes them your favorite?

SK: John Bennett is my absolute fave. He is a wordsmith whose pen is the hammer and the page is his anvil. He forges feelings that resonate like that slap to the face in an empty cool bathroom. Brass and sassy teetering on the edge of the precipice of human existence and sagacious. His snippets of truth a puncture in the skin of the body of cold facts, indeed.

PPP Ezine:  This one is a direct descendent of Matthew Arnold’s Touchstone Method: ‘They say that there are lines in a poem that make its heart. You may call them the poetry of poetry. Do you remember some such lines of yours or from some of your favorite poets that will help us understand your vision of poetry? If yes, please do give us some of those lines.

SK: Totally agreed! Some lines may dart through the heart of the reader. If I picked a few of them, the following would help you understand my vision of poetry. They are the finishing lines of my poem “The Ten Lepers”

“Human ingratitude more

sinister  than Satan’s rage”

PPP Ezine: There has been a debate raging among the lovers of free verse and formal verse. Where do you stand in this debate? Why?

SK: Right in the middle. I go with the moment and I think that a poem is beautiful in whatever form as long as the salient message comes through.

PPP Ezine: You have been writing for a long time. If you could tell us something about what inspired you to write poems in the first place, and then, what kept you going, it’d be inspiring for the new poets.

SK: My love for God has been my animating force. My travels to the Holy Land and Egypt have made me pursue a spiritual journey through words!Every poem is a beacon that guides my spiritual path. A landmark, so to speak, of self-discovery.

PPP Ezine: Give our new poets a few tips (3 or more) for composing well.

SK: Of course, good poetry presupposes technique but if it does not come from the heart it is just hollow. Poetry must serve as a vehicle for the edification of the soul  and give an important message

PPP Ezine: Rejection is a life-long friend or enemy of a poet. Please tell us how you responded/respond to your rejections in the past, and now?

SK: I use them as lessons to practice humility. Rejections are great motivators and chasteners.

PPP Ezine: A poet has a cultivated mind. Give us some pointers to cultivate the poetic faculties/genius.

SK: Read a lot and especially other poets’ work. A good reader is a good writer. so, read read read…

PPP Ezine: You have been published and read widely. Please give some tips on submission that increases the chances for selection.

SK: First of all, read the submission guidelines and of course browse through the content of the magazine to get an idea of what editors want to publish. I suppose this sums it all up.

 

Advertisements

PPP Ezine, Vol 1 Issue 2, Interview: Darrell Herbert

DH

PPP Ezine:  Who are your favorite poets, if possible, also tell us what makes them your favorite?

 

DH: My favorite poet is Sylvia Plath. I love how confident she was in terms of her subject matter, especially isolation and/or outlook on relationships.

 

 

PPP Ezine:     This one is a direct descendent of Matthew Arnold’s Touchstone Method: ‘They say that there are lines in a poem that make its heart. You may call them the poetry of poetry. Do you remember some such lines of yours or from some of your favorite poets that will help us understand your vision of poetry? If yes, please do give us some of those lines.

 

DH: My poem called “Perfect Form” can really connect with someone’s heart. The line I have chosen states “You know I can’t reach perfection if I’m not in your perfect form.”

 

 

PPP Ezine:  There has been a debate raging among the lovers of free verse and formal verse. Where do you stand in this debate? Why?

 

DH: I would rather free verse. I believe it is more complex to create.

 

 

PPP Ezine:  You have been writing for a long time. If you could tell us something about what inspired you to write poems in the first place, and then, what kept you going, it’d be inspiring for the new poets.

 

DH: Isolation is what inspired me to write poems in the first place. What keeps me going is also isolation.

 

 

PPP Ezine:  Give our new poets a few tips (3 or more) for composing well.

 

DH: Say what you feel, say what you mean, do what you say.

 

 

PPP Ezine:  Rejection is a life-long friend or enemy of a poet. Please tell us how you responded/respond to your rejections in the past, and now?

 

DH: I don’t really care about rejection, seeing as it is an inevitable experience of life.

 

 

PPP Ezine:  A poet has a cultivated mind. Give us some pointers to cultivate the poetic faculties/genius.

 

DH: Read different kinds of books, articles, and so on. Watch movies you have yet to witness. Listen to other people’s conversation closely.

 

 

PPP Ezine: You have been published and read widely. Please give some tips on submission that increases the chances for selection.

DH: Submit your work to magazines, contests, journals, newspapers, and so forth.

PPP Ezine, Vol 1 Issue 2, Interview: Ann Christine Tabaka

ACT

PPP Ezine:  Who are your favorite poets, if possible, also tell us what makes them your favorite?

 

ACT: I have never thought about it.  I never read much poetry by famous poets.  I do admire the work of several of my contemporary poets that are my Facebook friends.

 

PPP Ezine: This one is a direct descendent of Matthew Arnold’s Touchstone Method: ‘They say that there are lines in a poem that make its heart. You may call them the poetry of poetry. Do you remember some such lines of yours or from some of your favorite poets that will help us understand your vision of poetry? If yes, please do give us some of those lines.

 

ACT: No, I do not.

 

PPP Ezine:  There has been a debate raging among the lovers of free verse and formal verse. Where do you stand in this debate? Why?

 

ACT: I work in both metered rhyme, and free verse.  It depends on my subject matter and what mood I am in, also to what journal I am submitting my work.  My true love is light and amusing rhymes.

 

PPP Ezine:   You have been writing for a long time. If you could tell us something about what inspired you to write poems in the first place, and then, what kept you going, it’d be inspiring for the new poets.

 

ACT: I started writing in 1965.  I was inspired by the Viet Nam war since my brothers were in the military then.  Afterwards, it was the typical teenage angst and young loves that inspired me.

 

PPP Ezine:  Give our new poets a few tips (3 or more) for composing well.

 

ACT: Always carry a note book and pen or pencil with you.  Anyplace and anything can be a poem.  Write, write, write … you can always refine alter.  Just write what you see and what you feel at the momen.

 

PPP Ezine:   Rejection is a life-long friend or enemy of a poet. Please tell us how you responded/respond to your rejections in the past, and now?

 

ACT: I always just say “thank you for taking the time to consider my work.” And then move on.  It is never easy to be told you are not good enough – I do not like failure, but it is a part of life.

 

PPP Ezine:  A poet has a cultivated mind. Give us some pointers to cultivate the poetic faculties/genius.

 

ACT: I do not have any pointers.  I was a visual artist in my youth, and I just write or draw what I feel, nothing more, and nothing less.

 

PPP Ezine:   You have been published and read widely. Please give some tips on submission that increases the chances for selection.

 

ACT: Just make sure to know what the publisher wants.  I write all types of poems, and I do submit the wrong ones to the wrong journals at times, and that leads to more rejections.  Know your audience

 

 

PPP Ezine, Vol 1 Issue 2, Interview: Joanne Olivieri  

Jon

PPP Ezine:   Who are your favorite poets, if possible, also tell us what makes them your favorite?

JO: My favorite poets are the traditionalists.  Longfellow, Poe, Keats. Byron and Marlowe.  Their grasp of the traditional and classics styles are pure perfection.  In addition Maya Angelou for her real and proud poetry.  Sylvia Plath is also a favorite.  There is no other poet that has been able to master the art of imagery as she has.  I am always in awe and striving for her talent in this area.

PPP Ezine:   This one is a direct descendent of Matthew Arnold’s Touchstone Method: ‘They say that there are lines in a poem that make its heart. You may call them the poetry of poetry. Do you remember some such lines of yours or from some of your favorite poets that will help us understand your vision of poetry? If yes, please do give us some of those lines.

JO: I think in most poems, “the heart” is in the last lines of the poem.  That is not always true but I have have found it to be the norm.  An example is my poem that you have published.  I am describing the Tai Chi with the last lines encompassing the message.

PPP Ezine:    There has been a debate raging among the lovers of free verse and formal verse. Where do you stand in this debate? Why?

JO: In school we were taught formal/traditional verse.  For me, I love traditional verse and writing traditional is much easier for me.  There are literally hundreds and hundreds of formal styles out there and I think in order to write poetry at all, formal verse needs to be read and studied by poets.  As far as the debate, poetry comes from the heart and as long as your words convey a message, the style is secondary.  There are many publications that won’t even read anything other than free verse and personally I think that is wrong.  By doing that they are inconsiderate of the poets’ unique voice.

PPP Ezine:  You have been writing for a long time. If you could tell us something about what inspired you to write poems in the first place, and then, what kept you going, it’d be inspiring for the new poets.

JO: When I was ten years old, my Mom bought me a poetry book titled Speak Nature by James Walker Sr.  I fell in love with poetry by reading that book.  It was written in formal verse and each poem displayed a message about nature. I carried it everywhere I went.  In fact I still have it and read through it the other day.  Poetry was a means for me to express my feelings.  I was very shy as a child and poetry allowed me to speak through my words.  It is just a part of me now.  It’s a corner of my soul

PPP Ezine:  Give our new poets a few tips (3 or more) for composing well.

JO: First, always write from your heart.  Second, Study all different types of poetry and that will help you find your own voice. Third, Imagery is a key component to poetry.  Think of poetry as painting a picture on canvas with words.

PPP Ezine:   Rejection is a life-long friend or enemy of a poet. Please tell us how you responded/respond to your rejections in the past, and now?

JO: When I first began writing poetry I was about 12 years old.  I didn’t begin submitting until I was around 16.  I received many rejections and that always made me feel terrible.  Shortly after I entered a poem into a contest where the accepted poems were published in a book and the poets had to buy a copy.  It was a vanity press.  My poem was published and I received the copy.,  I was so excited and my Mom who always encouraged my poetry was even more excited.  When my Father got home from work that day I showed him the book and he barely took a glance at my poem, threw it on the table and said “why do you waste your time with this? you are never going to make any money doing this.”  I was so upset that I stopped writing for about a year.  My Mom kept encouraging me to write so I began submitting again.  That rejection from my Father actually helped me in that from then on whenever I received a rejection from a publisher, I took it as a challenge and wrote more and submitted more.

Now, I really don’t submit anymore as I have hundreds of publication credits to my name but it is always nice to be published again.

[EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an interesting story of how JO submitted her poems to PPP Ezine. Our poet Sofia Kiroglou made a kind of prophesy by counting JO among the poets published in the ezine. I appealed to JO in the name of poetry, Sofia, and prophesy to send her poems to the ezine, and graceful as she ever is, she sent her poems.]

PPP Ezine:    A poet has a cultivated mind. Give us some pointers to cultivate the poetic faculties/genius.

JO: A poet is forever curious and that is what makes a great poet. Experiencing the world and different cultures, experiencing nature and what is has to offer and being passionate about someone or some cause is what cultivates the poetic faculties genius.  Another point, let’s say you are walking along a road and there is a rock on the road. Look at the rock and become the rock and then write a poem as the rock.  I was taught this in a creative writing class in high school.  It’s a great way to cultivate imagery.

PPP Ezine:   You have been published and read widely. Please give some tips on submission that increases the chances for selection.

JO: As you well know, I am a stickler for submission guidelines.  I would say follow the guidelines to the letter. Beyond that write from your heart.

 

 

 

PPP Ezine, Vol 1 Issue 2, Interview: Sunil Sharma  

SS

PPP Ezine: Who are your favorite poets, if possible, also tell us what makes them your favorite?

SS: The Romantics. Younger ones like Shelley and Keats for questioning the hollowness of the industrial development and recovering of a Hellenic spirit. Baudelaire,Neruda and Ginsberg for being subversives; Eliot as a disrupter; Gabriela Mistral, Nicanor Parra and Jose Carlos Mariategui for humanism; Antonio Machado, Federico Garcia Lorca, Alejandra Pizarnik and Octavio Paz for their politics and guts; Shakespeare—for showing life in its richness and contradictions. Faiz for asking us to speak up; Ghalib for voicing pain; Dushyant Kumar for exposing hypocrisy; Gulzar for profundity in everyday. Endless list.

Common thread: Writing for the people, of the people; not of self or linguistic pyrotechnics that might dazzle but end up soon in a heap of dying embers and act as noxious carbon monoxide. In brief—writing as a change agent by radicalising consciousness of the recipient. These exalted poets do that only in different ways. Current writing, broadly speaking, despite its fantastic growth, is woefully lacking in this spirit and transformational ability. It does not possess this kind of capacity to mould and change. Social commitment is sorely missing from the plethora of posts in the cyberspace. Only self promotion, arranged interviews and reviews and race for awards in the Litfests run by the MNCs.

PPP Ezine: This one is a direct descendent of Matthew Arnold’s Touchstone Method: ‘They say that there are lines in a poem that make its heart. You may call them the poetry of poetry. Do you remember some such lines of yours or from some of your favorite poets that will help us understand your vision of poetry? If yes, please do give us some of those lines.

SS: ‘The time is out of joint—O cursèd spite, That ever I was born to set it right’.

‘In the room the women come and go/ Talking of Michelangelo’.

‘If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?’

The lines that contain whole worlds within. That show the way forward. That critique. That are moral. Almost a code of conduct for living in turbulent times.

PPP Ezine: There has been a debate raging among the lovers of free verse and formal verse. Where do you stand in this debate? Why?

SS: With free verse. Let there be a free flow of words, unchecked by the ossified regulations carried forward from a time-frame at variance with ours. Less formalism and its restrictions go with the temper of the new millennium. Poetry should be more liberal and sometimes, a disrupter. Iconoclasm is essential for the domain, for the status-quo. Most of the current poetry is expressed in free verse. it releases the poet from the tyranny of canon and restricted rules imported gleefully from an earlier era by the academic infra and interests. It is more liberating and approximates daily speech—hence, more democratic, real and authentic. And proving very popular. The distance, thus, between poet and everyday life and reader is dissolved.

PPP Ezine: You have been writing for a long time. If you could tell us something about what inspired you to write poems in the first place, and then, what kept you going, it’d be inspiring for the new poets.

SS: Humanism. We have to guard this cherished principle against the assault of cynical market forces out to de-legistimise and expel it. The Unsaid has to be articulated in the verse. The invisible to be made visible. The marginalized need to be rehabilitated bang on in the center. The poor and the underdogs are my chosen province and these folks keep on motivating to write about them in my poetry and prose works. i am not the type that experiments with syntax and language structures. No, i am not Joyce nor meant to be. Perhaps others can pretend to be. Frost is my ideal. Hemingway also. Writing has to be political. Pro people. Pro change.

PPP Ezine: Give our new poets a few tips (3 or more) for composing well.

SS: Be authentic. Listen carefully. Write properly. Community, not self, crucial for a career as a serious writer. Writing per se is a reward in itself. Rest does not matter. It is a sadhna.

PPP Ezine: Rejection is a life-long friend or enemy of a poet. Please tell us how you responded/respond to your rejections in the past, and now?

SS: Rejections are good tonic for an inflated ego; a sense of unequal self-worth. The slips—these days curt lines on computer screen— teach you the wider world does not yet recognize you as a celeb or a solid writer of repute but as a practitioner of a difficult art and you have to diligently follow the path trodden by more famous of your tribe—before they got enshrined in the pantheon.

It is always humbling for one that is ready to work hard on the craft. Tolstoy wrote the massive War and Peace seven times! I am sure none so far has so far surpassed that venerable saint from Yasnaya Polyana. Re-writes turn out to be much better.

Rejections! Best teachers.

PPP Ezine: A poet has a cultivated mind. Give us some pointers to cultivate the poetic faculties/genius.

SS: I doubt it, a statement that subconsciously echoes the 1833 John Stuart Mill and others of a later age, elevating the creative mind, romantically privileging the writer as the principal source, some kind of super hero. If in doubt, better ask Baudelaire. Or Chacha [Uncle] Ghalib. Or Sarat Babu, or for that matter, Gauguin. Picasso. Van Gogh. Great creative minds are not saints. They are ordinary people with extraordinary talents. Maugham has written one entire book on it, dissecting great minds and their immortal works. It demystifies the aura of greatness and shows frailties that make the literary immortals, so much endearing and humans—and vulnerable like the toiling masses.

PPP Ezine: You have been published and read widely. Please give some tips on submission that increases the chances for selection.

SS: Read the individual submission-guides carefully. Back issues tell you a lot about the preferred in-house style. Each journal has got a distinct personality. Be respectful to the edit team sweating it out just for the sake of it, expecting nothing. The poor guys certainly deserve a thank-you note, if not an overused smiley! Pompousness can be off-putting for the edit. And be ready to be rejected some places—and then accepted elsewhere. Much like your typical dating games these days. You don’t know what might click and what might backfire. No sure formula. You have to be in the 24X&7 process to crack it individually. However, good and clean copy helps grab some busy eyeballs. Bad grammar can be a turn off. So will be a rude or impersonal tone of the submit.

Old-world courtesy always works.

 

PPP Ezine Vol 1, Issue 2, July 2017

The beginning lays foundation and sets the tone. So, our beginning did the same for us. We published the first issue of PPP Ezine on time and sent the call for the second issue. The response was warm and poets from the ‘four corners of the world’ sent their poems to our Ezine. They also sent their wishes for its success, and their expectations form it in future. That future is not here, in front of us today, but we will travel together to it. To make the journey pleasant, we have poetry with us. In this issue we will meet sixteen poets and their poems.

Morning tai chi by Joanne Olivieri
Growth by Mike Griffith
Thou Shalt not Bow by Sofia Kioroglou
Lost and Found by Ann Christine Tabaka
Advaitic Terra Firma by James Dennis Casey IV
Prometheus Should Have Doubled Down for More by Scott Thomas Outlar
Perfect Form by Darrell Herbert
As far as eyes could see by Sanghpriya Gautam
In Flames by Yajnaseni Mukherjee
Silent Communication by Asha Visvas
Temp shelter by Sunil Sharma
Let me hear by Alok Ranjan
Murmurs by Ndaba Sibanda
I wish to withhold! by Suryasri Saha.
Shameless by Edianna Reyes Ovalle
Railroad by Richard Lutman

 

We will also read the views of these poets on poetry an poetics in their interviews. For this issue PPP Ezine interviewed five of its poets.

Interview: Sofia Kiroglou
Interview: Darrell Herbert
Interview: Ann Christine Tabaka
Interview: Joanne Olivieri
Interview: Sunil Sharma

You can download the pdf of PPP Ezine Volume 1, Issue 2, July 2017 using the link below:

PPP 2

You can download PPP Ezine Volume 1, Issue 2, July 2017 from scribd using the link below:

PPP V1 I2 July 2017

About the Poets

 

Joanne Olivieri is a published author and poet who is the editor of Stanzaic Stylings ezine. She has been writing for 50 years and has been published in numerous online and hard copy magazines to include Jerry Jazz Musician, Parnassus Literary Journal, Black Poppy Review and many more. Her poem “Symphony Of Lights” was chosen as one of the 300 Short Listed Entries in the initial round of the Cathay Pacific Airways – 100 Reasons We Love Hong Kong contest for July 2007. As a result, Joanne was awarded a round trip ticket to Hong Kong for her winning entry. You can find out more about Joanne on her website at http://joanneolivieri.weebly.com

Michael Griffith began writing poetry to help his mind and spirit become healthy as his body recovered from a life-changing injury. His works have most recently appeared both online and in print in Stanzic Stylings, the Starving Poets Tour anthology book, the Foxglove Journal, Degenerate Literature, NY Literary Magazine, and Wild Words. He teaches and resides near Princeton, NJ.

Sofia Kioroglou is a twice award-winning poet, editor and translator from Greece. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks and the co-editor of a handbook for Supply Chain Managers. Her poems have played on the radio and are included in many anthologies, and a number of literary journals and printed books that include Dumas de Demain, Galleon Liferary Journal, Pengician, Your One Phonecall, Lunaris Review, VerseWrights, Galway Review, The Outlaw Poetry Network,The Festival For Poetry, Verse-Virtual, Spillwords, In Between Hangovers,Odyssey.pm, Writink Page, Silver Birch Press, The Blue Nib, Poetry Super Highway, Halkyon Days, Ashvamegh, Fractal.gr, and Winamop, to name but a few. She has work forthcoming in Spillwords, Ariel Chart and Glance. To learn more about her work, visit: sofiakioroglou.wordpress.com or https://www.facebook.com/Sofia-Kioroglou-1851168701772737/. You can read her poetry chapbook here: https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/55336624/poems

Ann Christine Tabaka was born and lives in Delaware. She is a published poet, an artist, a chemist, and a personal trainer. She loves gardening, cooking, and the ocean. Chris lives with her husband and two cats. Her poems have been published in numerous national and international poetry journals, reviews, and anthologies.

James D. Casey IV is a published author of three volumes of poetry: “Metaphorically Esoteric,” “Dark Days Inside the Light While Drunk on Wine,” and “Tin Foil Hats & Hadacol Coins.” His work has been featured in print and online several times at places like Triadæ Magazine, Pink Litter, In Between Hangovers, Indiana Voice Journal, Poetry Breakfast, Beatnik Cowboy, Scarlet Leaf Review, Horror Sleaze Trash, Whispers, Your One Phone Call, I am not a Silent Poet, Tuck Magazine, Outlaw Poetry, PoeTree, Story Mirror, Stanzaic Stylings, Spillwords, Micropoetry, Leaves of Ink, Poetry Life & Times, and Realistic Poetry International. You can find links to his books, social network profiles, and other projects on his website by clicking here: http://louisianakingcasey.wixsite.com/big-skull-poetry

Scott Thomas Outlar hosts the site 17Numa.wordpress.com where links to his published poetry, fiction, essays, interviews, reviews, and books can be found. His work has received nominations for the Pushcart Prize on three occasions and Best of the Net. Scott serves as an editor for The Blue Mountain Review, Walking Is Still Honest Press, The Peregrine Muse, and Novelmasters.

Darrell Herbert is a recipient of a national silver medal and gold key, presented by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards of 2014. He is also a recipient of the 2016 Scythe Prize, and the 2017 Scythe Prize. He was one of the winners in the second North Street Book Prize competition. His fiction and non-fiction has appeared in the Utica College Ampersand. His poetry has been featured in the likes of the “Best Teen Writing of 2014,” by Hannah Jones, NotMyPresident Anthology, Writers- Black Artists Connected Blog, A Shared Format 4 Poets, Yellow Chair Review, Poetic Treasures Magazine, Section 8 Magazine, Blacktopia: Black Utopia Society Blog, Works in Progress newspaper, Woman of P.O.W.E.R. blog, Media Blast Press, Madness Muse Magazine, cocktailmolly, New York Rising Blog, thisis50.com, Supastars Magazine, downsouthhiphop.com, Beat Yard Magazine, All Black Entertainment Magazine, Southeast Hip-Hop Magazine, Poets & Writers Magazine, UC English Corner, Utica College Ampersand, Children’s Screams are Whispers, Tuck Magazine, Wild Sound Festival Review, Dwartonline, Zoomoozophone Review, The Naga, Scarlet Leaf Review, Free Lit Magazine, The Basil O’ Flaherty,Whispers in the Wind, as well as in HangTime Magazine and The Lemonade Stand Magazine.

Sanghapriya Gautam is an Indian poet whose inspiration is varied. From the Romantics to the Moderns, he has loved reading poems. He belongs to the tradition, yet his own self shines in his poems.

Yajnaseni Mukherjee speaks three languages, reads and writes poems in two, and dreams in one. She has always been a poet. She writes poems whenever she is not busy doing so many other mundane things. She also gets joy in teaching poetry and literature to University students.

Asha Viswas is a former Professor of English, Benaras Hindu University, Varanasi ,India. She has also taught at Aligarh and at the University of Calabar, Nigeria. She has published three collections of poems. The first collection Melting Memories was published in 1996 [Delhi]. For this she was awarded Michael Madhusudan Academy Award [Kolkatta] in 1997. Her second collection Mortgaged Moorings [writers workshop, Kolkatta] was published in 2001. For this she was given the Editors’ Choice Award by the International Library of Poetry , U.S.A. IN 2003.Her third collection of poems was published in 2011 [Kolkata]. Her poems have featured in the shortlist anthology of all India poetry competition organized by the British council and the poetry Society India , Slug fest [U.S.A.] , The Mawaheb International [Canada] ,The Brob Times [ Ireland] , Jalons [France] and various other journals and anthologies in India. Some of her poems have been translated into French. She has read her poems in Western Europe, the U.S.A. and African universities. She had a fan club of her poetry in the U.S.

Sunil Sharma is a senior academic and a widely-published writer from Mumbai, India. He has already published 16 books: five collections of poetry, two of short fiction, one novel; a critical study of the novel and six joint anthologies on prose, poetry and criticism. He is a recipient of the UK-based Destiny Poets’ inaugural Poet of the Year award—2012. His poems were published in the prestigious UN project: Happiness: The Delight-Tree: An Anthology of Contemporary International Poetry, in the year 2015. Sunil edits the English section of the monthly bilingual journal Setu published from Pittsburgh, USA: http://www.setumag.com/p/setu-home.html. For more details, please visit the blog: http://www.drsunilsharma.blogspot.in/.

Alok Ranjan is a poet from Hazaribag, Jharkhand. His poems reflect his state of existence and angst. At the same time they reflect the universal states too.

Ndaba Sibanda has contributed to the following anthologies: Its Time, Poems For Haiti- a South African anthology, Snippets ,Voices For Peace and Black Communion. He edited Free Fall (2017). The recipient of a Starry Night ART School scholarship in 2015, Sibanda is the author of Love O’clock, The Dead Must Be Sobbing and Football of Fools. His work is featured in The New Shoots Anthology, The Van Gogh Anthology edited by Catfish McDaris and Dr. Marc Pietrzykowski, Eternal Snow, A Worldwide Anthology of One Hundred Poetic Intersections with Himalayan Poet Yuyutsu RD Sharma scheduled for publication in Spring/Summer 2017 by Nirala Press and Seeing Beyond the Surface Volume II.

Suryasri Saha is doing B.Tech. She loves writing and believes that poetry is her forte. She is from India. Her poem ‘Nights-Soothing and Frightening’ has been published in the vol 2,issue 2 of ‘The Phenomenal Literature’ and ‘Loosening ties’ has been published in the first volume of ‘PoetryPoeticsPleasure’ Ezine. She has written a book: An Unexpected Love Story. Two of her poems have been earlier published in The Evergreen Poetry Journal. Her poem has been published in The top 100 poems of 2016 anthology and two other poems have been published in From the Heart magazine.

Edianna Reyes Ovalle evokes vital emotions, knowledge, morals, truths, and values, through writing. She loves being outspoken because it has helped her to freely express her opinions of the world and its people. Her work has been featured in the likes of HangTime Magazine.

Richard Lutman has a MFA in Writing from Vermont College. He has taught composition and literature courses at Rhode Island Community College, Fairfield University, The Learning Connection in Providence, Rhode Island, and short story classes as part of Coastal Carolina University’s Lifelong Learning program. He has published over two dozen short stories, three chapbooks, two novellas and one nonfiction book. He was a 2008 Pushcart nominee in fiction and the recipient of national awards for his non-fiction, short stories and screenplays. His first novel was published in May of 2016. His web site is: http://www.patchofdirt.net

PPP Ezine Vol 1, Issue 2: Growth by Mike Griffith

You run, run, Contrary, run from the garden –

Go!

 

Grow, grow, how did your garden grow?

 

No nasturtium, no nightshade;

passive posies and pale flaccid lilies, yes,

and the apple tree with its drooped fruit and blossoms.

 

You walk, walk over to the edge –

look back only once, for twice

and you’d never find the strength to leave.

 

Then you run, run Contrary,

run away, leave.

Leaves rustle and flutter by, leaf

leave now, by and bye.

 

Find your new spot,

plant your new garden –

plant there among the bones and shale.

 

First year fallow crops,

ashy fruits, hollow hopes –

but weed out the bones,

work the shale to soil,

bleed, bleed life into that soil.

Work until you grow new life,

until you plant, root,

grow less contrary and

run no more.

 

 

PPP Ezine Vol 1, Issue 2: Shameless by Edianna Reyes Ovalle  

Shamed for appearing too provocative

Objectified by the public, non-virgin, unattractive

Classified as a little too much for my place, in case you didn’t know, I run at my own pace

Born a female, unaware of my innate participation in sex becoming a disgrace

However, despite if I’m in the chase, I get called on anyway

Love games become one sided and unpredictable, in the favor of our men

A woman that sexually expresses herself is soon to be condemned

Yet, if a man sexually opens up

He becomes “the man”

Lifted up in glory

King James, up for the infinite chase

Stay confident, enjoy your fame

On the other hand, a woman can genuinely push a man away

Yet wickedly he plans

He sets the trap

Alters the woman’s environment

Only to lure her into his initial settlement

After all is said and done

She becomes the whore, not the victim of his game, shamed continuously for not remaining angelic

So pathetic, if only these judgmental so called angelic females knew

Cruel is what they are to their own group

Females bringing other females down

Women empowerment becomes completely gowned

Pills on the table, let me drown in this tub, and sob until my heart stops

But it could have all been more simpler

Women not just equal socially,

politically, and economically

But, also sexually, pardon my impurity